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Gail Hawes wafta twenty five + image

Techniques: Hand stitch, dipping into slip, kumihimo braiding
Materials: Rug canvas, earthen ware slip, stranded cotton
Dimensions (cms): H – 30, W – 1200, D – 1400
Photographer: David Chong @ Perth Photography

Looking into the evening sky the moon is a constant presence – shared with whoever else looks skyward. A new moon brings renewal every 29 days, and the waxing and waning influences many elements of our daily life. 

I love sitting by a water’s edge watching the moon rise and glimmer thru the darkness of the night. It is a time of reflection, a time to remember those with whom we cannot share the immediacy of the moment. Family and friends who live in other countries, whose lives we no longer share daily. By looking at the moon and remembering many great times shared, friends seem closer.

The fragility of life and memory is reflected in the fragility of the ceramic vessels, created by dipping canvas into earthenware slip. In the kiln, the canvas burns away leaving the earthenware. There is a void left by absence and the golden thread which has woven our lives together binds us still….

Gail’s artwork is rooted in the myths of rural tribal groups whose antique embroidered costumes she collects, overlayed with life experiences. She enjoys exploring the boundaries of materiality by combining the unfamiliar with the traditional in unexpected ways.

Gail is a member of the exhibition committee.   

Gail Hawes wafta twenty five + image

Techniques: Pleating, machine stitch
Materials: Silk fabric, wood model planking
Dimensions (cms): H – 85, W – 68
Photographer: Gail Hawes

For generations my family have been makers. My grandmother crocheted beautiful blankets and table cloths for all of her many grandchildren. Her son, my father, had a passion and extraordinary skill for creating scale model boats from plans. He loved researching sailing ships and boats and the significance of the journeys they had travelled. Then he carefully planked each and every piece of wood onto a hand crafted hull skeleton and deck.

This artwork explores our connection as makers. A combination of model boat making with textiles – the use of ‘planking’ within pleating to recreate some of the deck designs on the sailing ship decks he created.

This exploratory artwork encouraged my reminiscing of our independent yet shared journeys.

Gail’s artwork is rooted in the myths of rural tribal groups whose antique embroidered costumes she collects, overlayed with life experiences. She enjoys exploring the boundaries of materiality by combining the unfamiliar with the traditional in unexpected ways.
Gail is a member of the exhibition committee.   

Wafta twentyFIVE + crossover
on-line catalogue

includes essay by Erin Coates, Wafta history, images and statements from artists on the 42 art-works exhibited

wafta exhibition catalogue